The Hiztory Plugin – This Day in History on Your WordPress Website

We’ve become accustomed to writing snippets of shortcode – both the good and bad – and publishing here on Internoetics… but we’ve generally refrained from venturing into the WordPress.org plugin realm because of the issues generally associated with the commitment that comes with continued development of anything once you release it as a more formal product. That safe distance that we’ve maintained has come to an end.

We introduced you to some shortcode last week that would render ‘This Day in History’ information on your WordPress website (utilising our little API at Hiztory.org ). The code was flawed for one reason above any other: it would only retrieve a single result. It didn’t take more than a few hours before we had people asking for something that would permit them to add multiple events. What we’ll provide on this post will provide that feature.

Although Hiztory was originally built for one of our aviation websites , and despite aviation content being a clear focus moving forward, it hasn’t detracted us form building upon the data and adding multiple other modules that relate to various interest groups or countries. Despite not having released too many of these other components into the wild (just yet), we though we’d release version 0.1 of a WordPress plugin that eases the techo-burden of displaying this and all future content on your website.

Plugin Title: Hiztory
Description: Display historical events on your WordPress website with shortcode.
Download (downloaded 1169 times) | Plugin Page

Primary Differences

If you’re using the shortcode we’ve previously published, sadly, changing over to the plugin will require you to generate new shortcode in your posts and/or pages; it became apparent quite quickly that the options that we formerly provided weren’t the most appropriate. However, the change is advantageous. The time associated with the API request is now the time associated with your blog; we always expected to provide an option to include a GMT offset… but that isn’t necessary since we now plug into your own WordPress website’s timezone (as defined in SettingsGeneral). We now permit up to 15 results to be rendered on your website and have coded in a few extras that’ll permit you to offer a measure of customisation with how results are displayed.

Installing Hiztory

Like any plugin that you’ve ever installed into WordPress, it can be installed in a number of different ways.

The easiest method of installation is via the ‘Install Plugins’ menu on your own WordPress blog via  Plugins  ->  Add New  in the left hand menu. Search for “hiztory“. Since it’s essentially a misspelled word, we’re the only result with that keyword. Click Install Now… then Activate.

Of course, you could just download the zip file directly and then either upload it via the Upload option on the ‘Install Plugin’ administration page referenced above, or you could FTP the contents into your wp-content/plugins directory.


Once you click on Activate, you’ll see a Settings menu. Select it. Alternatively, you will now be able to select the History Shortcode option from your Settings menu.

Hiztory Setting from the WP Settings Menu

Selecting the settings menu directs you to the shortcode generator

The Hiztory shortcode generator is a form that’ll construct shortcode based on the (non-default) options your select.

Hiztory Shortcode Generator

By clicking on  Get Shortcode  at this point we’ll just generate default usage by way of nothing other than the [hiztory] shortcode.

Default Usage

The default output provides us with one historical aviation event. You’ll likely want to change this!

Syria announces that Damascus International Airport has reopened and is running scheduled flights after being closed for three days due to fighting between government and rebel forces in the area. - 2nd December 2012

Using the shortcode generator, and as an example, we’ll generate three results that’ll be cached locally for two hours. We’ll also change the formatting of the date so it renders as Sun 3rd Dec, 1944… and we’ll apply style to the date with html tags.

[hiztory number="3" datetags="em,strong" dateformat="D jS M, Y" cache="7200"]

Copy and paste the shortcode into your post/page text editor

You should note that the datetags, or the html formatting for the date, doesn’t include the < or > tag; this is automatically applied with the results.

The shortcode will generate the following result:

  • In the 1977 Benghazi Libyan Arab Airlines Tu-154 crash, a Tupolev Tu-154 leased from Balkan Bulgarian Airlines crashes near Benghazi, Libya due to fuel starvation, killing 59 of 165 on board. - Fri 2nd Dec, 1977
  • Syrian Air Force jets pound rebel-held suburbs around Damascus, killing and wounding dozens in an offensive to push rebels away from the Damascus International Airport and stop them from closing in on the capital. - Sun 2nd Dec, 2012
  • Launch: Space Shuttle Discovery STS-53 at 13:24:00 UTC. Mission highlights: Partially classified 10th and final DoD mission. Likely deployment of SDS2 satellite. - Wed 2nd Dec, 1992

Of course, you can choose not to display results in a list (as is the default case). In the next example, we’ll retrieve three historical events and format them in a block of text. By default, we’ll add the <br> tags after each event (you can change this in the option titled ‘After post HTML‘).

[hiztory number="3" type="events" datetags="strong" returnaslist="0" dateformat="l jS M, Y" cache="7200"]


Houston Rockets tie NBA record of 15-0 start - Thursday 2nd Dec, 1993
1st parlimentary election in newly reunified Germany - Sunday 2nd Dec, 1990
Muslim Shites release American held in Lebanon hostage Joseph Cicippio - Monday 2nd Dec, 1991


Retrieving Results for Another Date

By default, we’ll select the date associated with your WordPress installation in making our request to the API. At times, however, it might be necessary to render results for another arbitrary date.

By unticking the option that says “Yes, use WordPress blog time of for data requests?”, a date option appears. Keep in mind that this is a static date reference that won’t change over time.

Other Features

Some other features of the shortcode generation include:

  • Events relating to deaths, births, events and aviation.
  • Results between 1 and 15.
  • Custom separator between the content and date.
  • Defined or custom date format (using PHP’s date() function).

Using Shortcode in a Sidebar?

By default, WordPress doesn’t enable the filter that permits you to use shortcode in a sidebar widget. If you plan on using this plugin, a sidebar widget is probably the most appropriate place to display random history. To enable shortcode in widgets, we’ve create a simple form that’ll activate that function globally; it works outside our plugin as well.

If you’re using our custom functions plugin, this filter is enabled by default, so you don’t have to activate it.

Enable/Disable Sidebar Shortcode Support

RSS Feeds

There are a number of RSS feeds available that generate random output for each day. They are:

Births: http://www.hiztory.org/rss/birth.rss
Deaths: http://www.hiztory.org/rss/death.rss
Events: http://www.hiztory.org/rss/event.rss
Aviation: http://www.hiztory.org/rss/aviation.rss

The feeds can be consumed by most blogs and other CMS platforms by way of widgets and other types of integrated functionality. Certainly, in WordPress, there are countless plugins that’ll render feeds in different ways – not to mention shortcode, including our own.

The feeds are based on Australian Eastern Standard Time. If you’re elsewhere in the world, you can access a local feed using the following format:


Format is as follows: http://www.hiztory.org/[month]/[date]/[data-type].rss

The Future

We’ll build upon both the API and this plugin based almost exclusively on the feedback we receive. Some of the features that we’ll be including sooner rather than later include the following:

  • Ability to render results beyond the 15 limit currently imposed.
  • The API will shortly permit multiple events from multiple user defined categories (at the moment we only allow one category per request).
  • Geo-specific history queries
  • Additional categories (tech, marine, science, space, rail, country specific etc.).
  • Keyword filtering.

As a matter of interest, the shortcode we use to build the WordPress download box (with the download count) is scheduled in late January.

Let us know what you think.

Download from WordPress.

Plugin Title: Hiztory
Description: Display historical events on your WordPress website with shortcode.
Download (downloaded 1169 times) | Plugin Page

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